Intellectual Self-Defense: Logical Fallacies List

Intellectual Self-Defense: Logical Fallacies List

 

Intellectual Self-Defense: Logical Fallacies List

 

Hello everyone and welcome to my new “GREY PILL” video series of videos titled, “Intellectual Self-Defense: Understanding Logical Fallacies”. In this video series, you will discover the full logical fallacies list.

As humans, we all have arguments about various topics be it politics, religion, economical, even drama such as, you know- “he said she said” type arguments. Just about anything in existence can be argued upon. You even see this all over the net; you see it with your own family and friends, with strangers, on television, reality TV. Arguments are everywhere, and they can often lead to worst case scenarios. In essence, not everyone can be in agreement with everything. There’s always going to be some sort of, pull and tug of ideas and beliefs. So how can be as humans solve this? What is the solution?

Now in my honest opinion, I feel like a proper, good and VALID argument or debate, is one where both parties can come to a humble understanding and accept each-others point of view,  even if they disagree. And the delivery of how they convey their viewpoints should be done in a respectful and adult-like manner. Now a bad, invalid or “flawed” argument is an argument where one or both parties, makes it an effort to demoralize or devalue the other person in an attempt to solely prove the other person wrong. Not only does this lead the argument to an unknown, pointless destination, but it also leaves both parties stubborn in their beliefs and often gives off the impression of “childishness”.  So in arguments, you should never make it a mission to simply PROVE the other person wrong, but rather, to prove your point in the most logical and respectful way possible, while at the same time, allowing the other person to do the same. Even if you both disagree, by doing this, you increase your chances of the other person at least CONSIDERING your viewpoint, because psychology tells us that by default, it is human behavior for us to disagree with someone face to face, EVEN IF we actually agree deep down inside- and this mainly built upon pride and ego.

 

So with that being said, this is the reason why I wanted to create this video series. To help everyone participate in respectful, arguments and debates. Not only will these videos help you get your point across in the most effective way, but it will also stimulate your logic, reasoning and social skills intellectually which will always give you the upper hand in these situations, and you’ll become more mentally sharp!

 

Also, I would like to share an interesting book that I recently purchased titled:

“Logically Fallacious: The Ultimate Collection of Over 300 Logical Fallacies”

 

First off, I had absolutely NO idea there were over 300 known logical fallacies. here I am thinking there were no more than about 50. Apparently, I was wrong. I opened the book myself and discovered that there are actually hundreds of logical fallacies that one can study to become a true master of arguments. I’ll probably never make it past 50 at most. This is what I call, mental resistance at it’s best.  Imagine being able to break down the flaws in someone’s arguments using an entire database of fallacious comebacks and then watch as the person is stunned in disbelief. HAH! Now that’s what I call intellectual self-defense!! Check out the book below! 

 

 

Intellectual Self-Defense: Logical Fallacies List 

 

Top 10 tips for practicing Intellectual Self-Defence 
1. Know your history! (Not just the textbook history)2.Learn the facts relating to your topic of concern, especially the neglected ones!
3. Learn to explain your ideas simply to critical, non-specialist audiences.
4. Use, support, and, if possible develop sources of alternative media.
5. Use the Internet to its full advantage: read widely, read often, and be careful with the reliability of sources.
often, and be careful with the reliability of sources.
6. When in arguments (at least ones you wish to be
productive), try to seek common ground with opponents
rather than “defeat” them.
7. Develop listening skills.
8. Know your opposition in detail rather than simply
dismissing them. Read their publications, get to know and
understand their arguments properly.
9. When forced to justify your position, do so. But don’t just
accept a subordinate status in the hierarchy of ideas, also
go on the counterattack: make people holding mainstream
positions justify themselves to the same standards of
evidence that they are holding you to! (i.e., Ask them
questions as well.)
10. Be honest! Admit when you don’t know things!

For more information:
www.zpub.com/un/chomsky.html
chomskyat80.blogspot.com/2008/11/workshop-report-intellectual-self.html

 

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